Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Wondrous Words Wednesday


Wondrous Words Wednesday is hosted by BermudaOnion each week. It's an opportunity to share new words you've encountered in your reading, or highlight words that you particularly enjoy.

Here are three of  new-to-me words from some of my recent reads. 



From Sunshine and Shadows by Earlene Fowler:  "Beebs and Millee recently signed up as docents at the folk art museum."


 docent  noun -    
     1.  in some American universities, a teacher or lecturer not on the regular faculty.
      2. a tour guide and lecturer; as at a museum. 

In this example, I am sure Earlene Fowler meant the second definition. I was pretty sure what it meant based on the usage, but I wasn't sure. 



From The Husband's Secret  by Liane Morarity, 

"Was she on her way over to spruik Tupperware?"

spruik  verb - 
   Austral archaic slang, to speak in public ( especially of a showman or salesman)

It was difficult to find this definition. I had to look in the "free dictionary". 


"One man tried to abseil out of his apartment window, and the firemen in West Berlin tried to catch him with a safety net, but he missed and died."


abseil  intrans verb - 
   to rappel :  to descent at the end of a rope. 

This one is German in origin. From the American Heritage Dictionary.    ab (down) + seil (rope)

This one was pretty easy to discern from the use in the sentence, but it was new to me. 



What about you, did you know any of these?  Did you find some new words in your recent reading? 


Until next time, 
Stay Busy and Stay Happy


      

4 comments:

  1. Yay! I knew docent, but the other two were brand new to me! Thanks for sharing.

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  2. New words for me, interesting.

    http://tributebooksmama.blogspot.com/2013/11/wondrous-words-wednesday.html

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  3. I knew all but spruik. I like it too and I can think of several times I can use it. Thanks.

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  4. I knew docent but the other two are new for me. Sometimes I wonder how authors come up with words like those.

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